SIGN UP FOR OUR PERIODIC NEWSLETTER UPDATES!

Sign up to receive Small Food Business' free monthly newsletter packed with top food news, small business information, and practical marketing tips.  Your information will not be sold or shared with any third parties.
* indicates required

Categories:

Marketing

September 29, 2011

The 12 Core Customer Motivations That Can Help Drive Sales

As I mentioned yesterday, at the WOMMA conference there was a lot of talk about how customer motivations are a key component to building a successful marketing strategy. This is due to the fact that people not only make purchasing decisions based on the rational reasons they’re presented with – ie, this product has fruit and grains – but there is also an emotional driver that plays a large part into why people buy what they buy and why they choose the brands that they do.  As an example, I bought a pair of cowboy boots the other day not because I want to feel fashion-forward/youthful but because I truly want to live on a ranch and the boots make me feel transformed into a real cowgirl (I still need the ranch and horse but I’m getting there…)

This list was presented at WOMMA by MotiveQuest which has done extensive research on the topic.  In a nutshell, the presenter explained, consumers are looking to fill an emotional need by feeling one of the following when making a purchase:

 Accomplished, Adventurous, Connected, Creative, Transformed, Important, Playful, Wise, Youthful, Sensual, Rebellious, Responsible

Lest you think that people buy a product and determine which emotional need it fills afterwards, it’s important to note that people seek out products and brands that will fill those needs.  So, using yesterday’s cake example once again, a non-vegan may choose a vegan wedding cake as an act of rebellion against her parents, a groom may make a case for a traditional tiered cake because to him it’s a sign of success and will help him feel accomplished, a bride may opt for a topsy-turvy cake as an expression of her creativity, and the in-laws may argue for the bargain-priced baker to help them feel like they are being responsible.

As you can see, these “feelings” and motivations have nothing at all to do with the actual product attributes.   Do you know where your product or brand fits on this scale?

Leave a Reply

As Seen In: